Friday, November 28, 2014

My Dream Job

It's been a terribly long time. I've decided to make this blog more of a place to actually blog than to share images which is why it's been forever since I've posted anything. If you want to follow my work, the best place to do it is my Facebook page: 

www.facebook.com/randybishopart

Anyway, without further adieu, here's a blog post!

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Okay, so after going to CTNX this past weekend my mind has just been reeling with what the future might hold for me and my career and I decided that tonight I just wanted to barf a bunch of words at whoever will read them. Forgive me if this turns out to make no sense at all. I'm just trying to work out a few things in my head.

I've been working as a freelancer for the past few years which has been great, but I've been starving for a more collaborative atmosphere. Being around all the amazing people over the weekend, (including a lot of you), helped to reinforce a feeling I've had for a while...

I think it might be time for a studio job.

One of the many perks of working as a freelancer has been to pick and choose the jobs I take or don't take. I've been fortunate to work on some really fun projects as well as some that I've wished I hadn't taken. The biggest issue I run into is the lack of creative company.

One of the coolest things about college for me was being in classes with other super-nerdy-crazy-art people. The atmosphere was just so exciting and infectious that I couldn't help but want to produce awesome stuff. It would be really nice to work in that kind of atmosphere all the time. As it is I sit alone at my desk all day working on whatever project happens to be on top of the stack. I still get to flex some creative muscles, but there's always this longing to work on something that really matters, you know? The whole reason that I've wanted to work in the entertainment industry my whole life is to get people to feel things. I want to make people cry when they see something I've done.

Anyway, enough moping.

Working on Monomyth for the past few years has been a great way for me to release some of the tension that I get built up. My friend Mack and I have been working on this crazy awesome story for 5 years now and I still get excited thinking about how awesome it could be with the right team of people involved! Lately we've been slowly dipping our toes into the role of producer and seeing what I can get done with the very limited resources we have at our disposal. If you haven't seen what has come of it you should take a look at the Monomyth fan page. The response to us reaching out for help has been phenomenal and I want to thank all of you for being such incredible fans and people!

After art directing this thing for a little while, I find myself obsessed with the idea of running my own studio. I want to make my own movies! I want to decide what gets put in front of people at the theater, you know? There's nothing greater than watching an amazing movie, or reading an amazing book, or listening to amazing music for the first time. It's such a thrill! And I want to give that to people.

I just don't know how to go about it is all. Anyway, thanks for letting me ramble, guys. It's been so great to know that people like what I do! It means a lot. Feel free to share your thoughts on the virtues or vices of working in a studio verses working as a freelancer. I love hearing what you have to say.

If you missed the link to the Monomyth page, here it is:

http://www.facebook.com/monomythshorts

Thanks again. You are all the best!

3 comments:

  1. Yeah - I hear ya. I used to work at a place that had that kind of energy (small game studio) - it was AWESOME. Totally made me want to be a better artist. I used to love the critiques we would have because they were constructive and thoughtful - not people trying to tear down someone else's work. Most of us had side-projects going as well, and it was great to get the input from other artists. Most of the time, their suggestions would kind of take me aback because I'd attached my ego to my work, and wasn't hearing what they were saying - but - if I took the time to step aside and really ponder it, the changes they suggested usually would improve the piece - I improved as an artist dramatically during that time. For 6 years, I was STOKED to go to work every day - how many people get to experience that?

    And then .... it all came apart. That small company grew larger and became more compartmentalized. Guys who had been open and constructive began to keep their tips and tricks to themselves - and became destructive in their criticisms - trying to protect the fiefdoms they'd carved out. The corporate environment turned "friends" into backstabbing douchebags - what they felt they had to do to "get ahead". The environment went from fun to toxic in about 2 1/2 years.

    So, if you can find a great environment, jump in - they are out there. If you look hard enough and ask enough questions, you can find a place where you fit well. The upside for you is that you don't *need* to find that job - you can take your time. The other option is of course to start your own studio and bring people in - just realize that with that comes all the business stuff that artists aren't usually prepared for (scheduling, contract negotiations, presentations, billing, payroll, insurance, yada, yada, yada) - so be prepared to give up some of your creative time to slide further into management.

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  2. I really liked this part of the article, with a nice and interesting topics have helped a lot of people who do not challenge things people should know... you need more publicize this so many people who know about it are rare for people to know this... Success for you.....!!!

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